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Bacterial Viability and Gram Stain Kit

A convenient assay for distinguishing between gram-negative and gram-positive, as well as live versus dead bacteria.

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200 assays
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Product Description

The Bacterial Viability and Gram Stain Kit contains three dyes (CF®488A WGA, DAPI and EthD-III) for distinguishing between gram-negative and gram-positive, as well as live versus dead bacteria.

Features

  • A fluorescent assay for microscopy or flow cytometry
  • Simpler than traditional gram staining
  • Uses wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), which binds to peptidoglycans in gram-positive bacteria
  • Test viability and gram stain status in the same sample

Kit Components

  • CF®488A Wheat Germ Agglutinin (WGA)
  • Ethidium Homodimer III (EthD-III)
  • DAPI

Spectral Properties

  • CF®488A WGA Ex/Em 490/515 nm
  • EthD-III Ex/Em 522/593 nm
  • DAPI Ex/Em 358/461 nm

WGA binds specifically to N-acetylglucosamine in the peptidoglycan layer of gram-positive bacteria. The Bacterial Viability and Gram Stain Kit contains WGA conjugated to CF®488A to stain the surface of gram-positive cells with green fluorescence. Ethidium Homodimer III (EthD-III) is a nucleic acid binding dye that is membrane impermeable, which selectively stains cells with compromised plasma membranes with red fluorescence. All cells stain blue with the membrane permeable DNA dye DAPI. One kit is sufficient for 200 assays when used according to the kit protocol.

The Bacterial Viability and Gram Stain Kit has been tested on the following bacterial species: Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis, Escherichia coli, Micrococcus luteus, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Staphylococcus epidermidis.

 

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