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DiR

DiR is a lipophilic, near-infrared fluorescent cyanine dye. The dye is useful for labeling cytoplasmic membranes and has been used for near-infrared in vivo imaging. Note: The 25 mg size of DiR will no longer be offered after January 1, 2020. DiR will be available in 10 mg and 5 x 1 mg sizes.

Product Attributes

CAS number

100068-60-8

Cellular localization

Membrane/cell surface, Membrane/vesicular

For live or fixed cells

For fixed cells, For live/intact cells

Fixation options

Permeabilize before staining, Fix after staining (formaldehyde), Fix before staining (formaldehyde)

Colors

Near-infrared

Excitation/Emission

748/780 nm

Size
Catalog #
price
Qty
25 mg
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Product Description

Note: The 25 mg size of DiR will no longer be offered after January 1, 2020. DiR will be available in 10 mg and 5 x 1 mg sizes.

DiR (DiIC18(7); 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindotricarbocyanine iodide) is a lipophilic, near-infrared fluorescent cyanine dye. The dye is useful for labeling cytoplasmic membranes and has been used for near-infrared in vivo imaging. The two long 18-carbon chains insert into the cell membrane, resulting in specific and stable cell staining with no or minimal dye transfer between cells. A stock solution of the dye can be made in ethanol. Cell staining can be effected using the dye at 1-10 uM concentration and 10-20 min incubation time.

Please also see our near-infrared CellBrite™ NIR Cytoplasmic Membrane Dyes, as well as CellBrite™ Cytoplasmic Membrane Stains available in a variety of colors.

  • λExEm (MeOH) = 748/780 nm
  • ε = 270,000
  • Dark blue-green oily solid soluble in ethanol, DMF or DMSO
  • Store at -20°C
  • C63H101IN2
  • MW: 1013.4
  • [100068-60-8]

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